Europe

Poland wants to ban the Communist party

An analysis conducted by the Prosecutor’s office showed that members of the Communist Party of undermine the democratic order in the country.





The Prosecutor General of Poland appealed to the constitutional court of the country with a statement that the goals and activities of the existing Communist Party of Poland (KPP) do not correspond to the Constitution, the press service of the Prosecutor General’s office reports.

An analysis conducted by the Prosecutor’s office showed that members of the Communist Party of Poland undermine the democratic order in the country.

“The goals of the KPP are identical to those of other Communist parties that exercised totalitarian power in the Communist States of the twentieth century. Its members openly call for a revolution similar to the October revolution in , after which the Bolsheviks came to power. The goal is not only to seize power but also to “force nationalization and collectivization,” the press service of the Prosecutor General’s office emphasizes.

According to investigators, the official program of the party States, among other things, that “the proletariat cannot simply take control of the bourgeois state apparatus, for example, through parliamentary ”, “in order to eliminate class inequality, it is necessary to overthrow capitalist property and replace it with public property”.

In addition, the Polish Prosecutor General’s office criticized the fact that the KPP expresses admiration for the political system of the Soviet Union, Soviet leaders, and the actions of the red army, and does not condemn the Katyn tragedy.

According to the provisions of article 13 of the Constitution of Poland, the existence of political parties and other organizations that use totalitarian methods and practices of Nazism, fascism, and communism in their programs is prohibited.

It also prohibits the existence of political parties whose programs or activities involve or permit racial or national hatred, the use of violence in order to gain power or influence state policy, or ensure the confidentiality of structures or membership.



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